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Marvelous photos. Tx for pointing them out.
Yep, California is the place to be but you are so right about how expensive it is. Now if I had my way, I would be moving to Tucson, Arizona. Oh, I love Arizona. I wasn't saying that her stuff was bad by being photoshopped, her stuff is great!! Sorry, if you all misunderstood me.
Suzi - if you move to Tucson, let me know. I live south of Tucson in Green Valley - another great place to live.
I remember a great restaurant just a little ways out of Tuscon, our local guy took me my first business trip there. Restaurants have a pretty short shelf life; it may no longer be around.

When you walked from the parking lot to the front door you passed a row of 55-gal drums split in half and used as bar-b-que "pits" (mesquite on the coals). The menu in this place was real simple - there wasn't one. You had a choice of steak or chicken; all you had to decide was how big a serving you wanted.

The tables were picnic-bench style and they were pre-loaded with condiments, big bowls of baked beans and platters of corn on the cob.

We had a job going that brought me back to Tuscon 5 times over the next 18 months -- I insisted on going back to that restaurant at least once each trip. I'm sure this was all heart-healthy stuff, and it sure was good.

Rusty
There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness" - Dave Barry

If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough. - Robert Capa

www.prestophoto.com/photos/gallery/19932
Rusty, it is still there, one of my favorite places when I go visit my daughter. Very rustic!!
Carol, I will be there sometime later this summer, will let you know,maybe we can get together!!
Rusty wrote: I remember a great restaurant just a little ways out of Tuscon, our local guy took me my first business trip there. Restaurants have a pretty short shelf life; it may no longer be around.

When you walked from the parking lot to the front door you passed a row of 55-gal drums split in half and used as bar-b-que "pits" (mesquite on the coals). The menu in this place was real simple - there wasn't one. You had a choice of steak or chicken; all you had to decide was how big a serving you wanted.

The tables were picnic-bench style and they were pre-loaded with condiments, big bowls of baked beans and platters of corn on the cob.

We had a job going that brought me back to Tuscon 5 times over the next 18 months -- I insisted on going back to that restaurant at least once each trip. I'm sure this was all heart-healthy stuff, and it sure was good.

Rusty


I would love to know what place that is. I would like to visit it.
Rusty, I think she made some selections the create a composite and use topaz or HDR software to fisnish the image that looks like a sandune.
Rusty, IMHO the owl picture was taken with a F2.8 telefoto in the 200 to 300 mm range camera on tripod. Then the picture was croped to a panorama format. It seems she used this lens for almost all the closedups and birds pictures due to the shalow DOF. She did excellent color balance and composition on her images. :thumbsup:
Shalom,
Don
A well conseived image is a poem written with light.
PSE6 - Lightroom - CS3 - Win-Vista -Epson 7800
Nikon D80 - D-700 - Canon G9
http://www.condeimaging.com
Rusty, Definately some gorgeous images; photoshop or not, she has to start with some high quality SOOC to get quality like this, and yes, that is what this forum is all about. Thanks for the link.
Joe

Joe's Place
My Zenfolio


Life is too short to drink cheap wine!
These are very high quality photos. Anyone who has ever tried to photograph a snowy or any bird in flight will realize the difficulty of getting a shot like that snowy flying right at you. As for photoshop. These are not being entered in a contest with PSA rules so photoshop away. Her composition is good. her exposures are good. she is taking photos at as very high level.
What is the "PSA' and its Rules?
I was checking out the Royal Photographic Society (about 150 years old and has branches around the world) and their rules for submissions to competitions and "RPS Distinctions" are quite liberal and even require some competence with software (for digital entries).

The "Distinctions" are pretty meaningless nowadays, not much more than an ego trip, as only professional photographic qualifications (in UK that's the British Institute of Professional Photographers) really cut the mustard or 'open doors'. Still, I'm working towards a portfolio of shots for what they call the "Licentiate Membership of the RPS'", aka the coveted LRPS. This can lead to Associate membership (ARPS) and Fellowship (FRPS) - though you've practically got to invent a whole new photographic process to get that one. I can enter from here in Canada, though there's no RPS branch here, whereas there are two in the USA (East and West) (no idea about the middle bit).
PSE6 on WinXP, Pentax K10d...... and now a Canon G10.

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